It's easy enough to find vegan snacks; after all, things like store-bought hummus, fruit, and some crackers come that way naturally. But when a real craving hits, we tend to want something packed with tons of flavor—like a sweet-and-sour eggplant caponata for dipping, a batch of hearty homemade Wheat Thins, or a piece of avocado toast that's gussied up with sweet baby peas and spicy radishes. Because there's a time and a place for everything, including junky snacks, we also have recipes for saucy Korean-style fried cauliflower and fully loaded nachos covered in a vegan queso-style sauce. Keep reading for 18 of our favorite vegan snacks that will fend off any attack.
Can snacking be a part of a healthy diet? Of course! When you choose a snack, choose one with protein, fat and/or fiber. All of these nutrients take longer to digest, so they fill you up. Snacks are also a great way to add extra nutrition to your day. Think of snacks like carrots and hummus, an apple with almond butter or whole-grain crackers with cheese.
Ah, i need to make some chz but I’m not sure when. The cheese I have on my mind is tapioca based. Definitely need a soy free cheese because I doubt Mark will eat it (or eat much of it). Its funny because if I make something soy based he’ll eat it so I don’t have to. But if I make vegan cheese he often doesn’t. At least if it has a bunch of nutritional yeast he’ll avoid it.

For a dairy-free take on addictive spinach-artichoke dip, a purée of cooked cauliflower and raw cashews proves impressively effective as a creamy base. We blitz them in the food processor along with the cauliflower cooking liquid, then add flavor to the mixture with vegan mayonnaise (homemade or store-bought), nutritional yeast, mustard, garlic powder, and lemon juice. Add the artichokes and cooked spinach, pulse until combined, and it's ready to be baked until browned and bubbling.
Snacks can absolutely fit in your diet if you're trying to lose weight. Having ideas for healthy snacks to pack for work snacks, grab and go snacks, store-bought snacks and snacks you can make yourself will help vary the nutrients you get and keep you from going hangry between meals. Remember, think nutrient-dense (fiber, protein, vitamins, minerals) and your snacks will help you get the nutrition your body needs and keep you full.
Indulge in this sweet and savory combo with zero guilt, even if you guzzle down a whole bowl in one sitting: "Fresh melon is satisfying because of the sweet flavor and high-water and fiber content. Top with hot sauce for a pungent kick and added boost to your metabolism from the capsaicin [it contains]," says Julieanna Hever, R.D., author of The Vegiterranean Diet.
For a savory snack under 60 calories, spread 1 tablespoon of low-fat cream cheese onto a slice of smoked salmon (lox) and roll it up. This salmon pinwheel is high in protein and heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, though the salt used to cure the salmon boosts the sodium content. Use a little less cream cheese and you can have two pinwheels for under 100 calories.

Can snacking be a part of a healthy diet? Of course! When you choose a snack, choose one with protein, fat and/or fiber. All of these nutrients take longer to digest, so they fill you up. Snacks are also a great way to add extra nutrition to your day. Think of snacks like carrots and hummus, an apple with almond butter or whole-grain crackers with cheese.


This is more of a dessert than a snack but I still eat it for a snack quite often, especially during the summer. To make it add frozen strawberries, a small piece of frozen banana and 1/2 a scoop of vanilla vegan protein powder to a high-powered blender. Add just enough plant-based milk to allow it to blend, just a few tablespoons is perfect, and blend until smooth.

Known for being a cheap staple, rice and beans is a classic lazy person’s meal that’s also good for you! Brown rice is packed with hardy nutrients and can be made in large batches to last for a few days worth of meals. If you don’t have the time to cook rice on the stove, opt for using instant. Although the texture will be different, this is still a healthier option for the time-crunched than processed foods and breads. Beans make a killer counterpart to rice as they are incredibly cheap and will keep you full for hours. Black beans, kidney beans, chickpeas or black-eyed peas are all quality options and are easy because you can buy them in a can. Make sure to rinse them well before using. Check out this White Bean Wild Rice Hash or this Cilantro, Lime and Black Bean Rice for either a side dish or a main course, and see Easy Ways to Spruce Up Classic Rice and Beans for more help to those feeling lackadaisical.
I say potayto, you say potahto, we all say baked potatoes! Potatoes are a lazy cook’s best friend—cheap, adaptable and filling—how could you go wrong with that? Skip the mashing, the French fries,  go and just bake your potatoes instead. While baking potatoes can take about an hour, it’s actually perfect for the lazy cook. Just pop it in the oven and come back when it’s ready! For the lazy and the time-crunched, wrap your potato in a wet paper towel and microwave until tender, around 4-7 minutes. To make your baked potato into a meal, make sure to stuff them with robust fillings. Beans, vegan cheese, crumbled tempeh, or frozen veggies are all simple ingredients for stuffing. Use these 8 Ways to Make Badass Baked Potatoes as inspiration for your own creations or try these Twice-Baked Cheesy Hummus Potatoes. For a meal with more nutrients and antioxidants, try using baked sweet potatoes. The lentil, kale, or Mediterranean recipes in 10 Ways to Stuff a Sweet Potato would be perfect options for the hungry and lazy vegan.
Use this guide as a great starting point for a lot of healthy snacks (and a few that are not so healthy). Of course, you don't need to be vegan to enjoy some of these tasty snacks. These snacks are also great if you are heading to a potluck, office party, or school event. By bringing a vegan snack, you'll share a healthy option and something that someone who may be dairy-free, gluten-free, or vegan (or vegetarian) can happily enjoy.

For many women, dieting equals food restriction. Snacks? They usually get eliminated in the name of saving calories. But snacking when you're watching your weight is actually a good idea. "[When dieting,] people often wait too long in between meals, so by the time they eat, they're so hungry, their portions or choices are out of control," says Linda McLachlan, RD, CDN, a New Jersey dietitian with Nutrition Matters, LLC. "Snacking helps keep you satisfied and wards off cravings." Here, seven low-calorie snacks to help you with your diet goals.

Oatmeal is a low-fat, high-protein superfood that your body digests slowly — meaning you'll stay satisfied longer — because of all of its bulky soluble fiber. Minchen swears by this easy recipe: Combine 1 cup dry quick oats, 2/3 cup coconut flakes, 1/2 cup almond butter, 1/2 cup whole chia seeds, 1/2 cup dark chocolate chips, 1/3 cup raw honey, and 1 tsp vanilla. Let the mixture cool in the refrigerator for 1 hour in an airtight container, then roll into 1-inch balls, which you can eat throughout the week.

Though nuts are caloric and easy to overeat, they're also energy-dense and high in protein and fiber, so munching on them can cause you to eat less later. For a crunchy, low-sugar, low-carb snack, Minchen likes to mix together 1/8 cup almonds, 1/8 cup walnuts, 1/8 cup pumpkin seeds, and 1/8 cup dried cranberries. You can eat it dry or over milk — Minchen recommends plain almond or hemp milk.
Need to use up some leftover ingredients? Make a pita pizza! Don’t fret about making the dough, that’s what whole grain pita bread is for. While pita bread makes filling and tasty sandwiches, it’s also a great base for loading toppings on. Whole grain pita bread is typically high in protein and fiber, and it’s ideal for the lazy vegan because it’s already cooked for you! Pita pizza is also awesome because it’s just the right size for one person. Start with pita bread, spread on some sauce, add some non-dairy cheese, and pile on any vegetables you have on hand. This Vegan Pepper Jack Cashew Cheese is my favorite as it will add some spice to your Homemade Pita Bread. For an easy fix, use store-bought vegan cheese like Daiya or Tofutti. Mushrooms, tomatoes, spinach or broccoli are healthy options for vegetable toppings, and many of these can come frozen or from a jar. Check out this Ultimate Guide to Making Homemade Pizza and simply use a pita for the base. After assembled, pop your pita in an oven at 425 degrees for 8-10 minutes and you’ve got yourself a quick and wholesome meal.
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