Not really corn but that’s what the blogger to the original recipe (linked below) called it so I’ll stick with that. That was my first time trying the Field Roast frankfurters. Usually I don’t buy shit from the hippie section because of my lame soy sensitivity but I need to start looking more because these are soy free options (no one cares) there once I really looked. These very much inspire me to want to step up my seitan game. I like making lazy, flavorless seitan but I think it would be in my best interest to at least know how to recreate these. Total game changer!
Need to use up some leftover ingredients? Make a pita pizza! Don’t fret about making the dough, that’s what whole grain pita bread is for. While pita bread makes filling and tasty sandwiches, it’s also a great base for loading toppings on. Whole grain pita bread is typically high in protein and fiber, and it’s ideal for the lazy vegan because it’s already cooked for you! Pita pizza is also awesome because it’s just the right size for one person. Start with pita bread, spread on some sauce, add some non-dairy cheese, and pile on any vegetables you have on hand. This Vegan Pepper Jack Cashew Cheese is my favorite as it will add some spice to your Homemade Pita Bread. For an easy fix, use store-bought vegan cheese like Daiya or Tofutti. Mushrooms, tomatoes, spinach or broccoli are healthy options for vegetable toppings, and many of these can come frozen or from a jar. Check out this Ultimate Guide to Making Homemade Pizza and simply use a pita for the base. After assembled, pop your pita in an oven at 425 degrees for 8-10 minutes and you’ve got yourself a quick and wholesome meal.
Carrots are always a great hydrating snack, but when you add tahini to the mix, you up the protein big time. "Carrots contains high levels of antioxidants, while tahini contains more protein than milk and most nuts," says Michael Kubyk, nutritionist and fitness trainer at Lake Austin Spa Resort. And the best part? The combo makes for an easy on-the-go snack.
Eating a snack between meals helps curb your hunger so that you don't inhale your dinner when you finally sit down to eat a meal. Snacking can also help you get in all the nutrients you need. On the flip side, grazing all day-particularly on foods with little nutritional value-may result in eating too much. It's a great idea to shop for snacks at the grocery store and pack them for work so you are prepared when hunger strikes. Many of these are also great on-the-go snack options.

This classic Sicilian eggplant dish, terrific as a spread, a dip, or a pasta sauce, is proof positive that vegan food doesn't have to be bland. The sweet-and-sour mixture packs in all sorts of intense flavors, including pine nuts, mint, raisins, capers, and vinegar. Even with the long ingredient list, it's not that hard to make: By cooking the ingredients in a particular order, we've engineered this recipe to use just one skillet.
Are you a terminally lazy cook? Don’t worry, you’re not alone. Plant-based eating is incredible in that it offers many benefits of developing healthy relationships with food and a deeper appreciation for spending more time in the kitchen. Plant-based eating can also require more time planning meals and more thought into getting proper nutrients. With this said, sometimes we all feel inevitably lazy and don’t want to spend our whole evening in the kitchen. Whether we are busy bees or just don’t enjoy cooking, sometimes a fast, cheap and easy meal is all we need. With laziness comes the desire for convenience, but have no fear, making vegan meals convenient and trouble-free is completely possible.
Peanuts will keep you feeling full, while the small amount of chocolate will satisfy your sweet tooth and prevent you from indulging again. But since peanuts are high in fat and calorie-dense, moderation is key. "Consider this smart snacking — studies suggest that consuming nuts may result in you eating fewer calories over the rest of the day," says Ansel.

For a savory snack under 60 calories, spread 1 tablespoon of low-fat cream cheese onto a slice of smoked salmon (lox) and roll it up. This salmon pinwheel is high in protein and heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, though the salt used to cure the salmon boosts the sodium content. Use a little less cream cheese and you can have two pinwheels for under 100 calories.
I make this pudding when I want something indulgent tasting, but don’t feel like eating a ton of sugar. I love mixing carob powder and cocoa powder for a more complex chocolate flavour. The carob powder also adds a natural sweetness as an added bonus. If you don’t have carob, I suggest using a bit more cocoa powder and sweetener since it will be less sweet without the carob. Serve cold or heated up!
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