Try not to over blend it or it will start to blend from the heat of the blender. It’s better if it’s ultra-thick and a little chunky. Once it’s blended, scoop it into a bowl and enjoy. You can make this with any frozen fruit but I’d recommend at least a small chunk of frozen banana for the perfect creaminess. Frozen mango and peaches are some of my favourites. Of course you can make it with chocolate protein powder too.
Bust out your slow cooker and make some chili. A pot of chili will last you all week long and is perfect for any season and for any meal. Vegan chili is super easy; all you need are some spices, a couple cans of beans, and simple vegetables like corn, onion, and tomatoes. Chili is adaptable and tastes super with other ingredients like beer or sweet potatoes. This Three Bean and Sweet Potato Chili is a vegan wonder as you just need to add your ingredients and let them simmer. Same goes for this Sweet and Spicy Pumpkin Chili. Chili also makes for an extraordinary make-ahead meal. For the more adventurous, add some vegan sour cream or cheese for an extra indulgence. To use up those leftover pantry goods, this Frito Chili Pie is an American bar-food staple that definitely suits a lazy vegan lifestyle. For more slow cooker ideas beyond chili, try using protein-packed lentils in stews and soups.
I don’t use nutritional yeast any more. It’s like $20 a bag full here in Tasmania (that’s IF you can find it in the first place). I made a tapioca based cheese and it sat in the fridge as Steve wasn’t keen on it but then in my “waste not want not” phase, I decided to throw it into a batch of bechamel and again, it was amazing. Sometimes it’s not the product that is wonderful but how you can use it that matters. We can’t get Follow your heart products here (heck, we don’t even have Earth Balance!) but I have found several interesting starch based egg replacement products on the net (recipes for how to make). The best vegan quiche we ever made was based on chickpea flour so I guess it really is horses for courses.
I want to make fermented cheeses though and will be experimenting a lot. I did recently use sunflower seeds in a recipe for cashew cheese (who can afford cashews these days!) and it turned out amazingly cheezy. I was making a quiche but the texture of the quiche was off (I only had extra firm tofu) and although it was really tasty, it wasn’t a huge success. I didn’t want to waste it so I boshed the quiche (I made it crustless) into a large batch of bechamel sauce that I was making for a vegan lasagna and it made the sauce AMAZING. Here’s the sunflower seed recipe if you want. I do have a vitamix blender (prehistoric from WAY back last century when we worked) but I am quite sure as the sunflower seeds are soaked, that you could get away with a cheaper blender or food processor, just let it run for a bit. Hope you like it. It tastes really cheesy.
Take my advice. Try it. It’s so frigging easy. Just bish bash bosh the dry stuff together (easier if you buy the spices already ground but still easy peasy if you don’t) and then the wet stuff and thanks to the coconut oil it’s very easy to form into shape and roll. I have had a go at making vegan cheeses. I once made a recipe for vegan pot luck on one of my old blogs for a stromboli using homemade “cheeze”. I want to make fermented cheeses as Steve used to love cheese a LOT. Here’s the link to that recipe. It makes a great stromboli or pizza cheeze.

For a more substantial alternative to cookies, try these no-bake, oat-based bites, where almonds and almond butter pack in healthy fats to make them highly satisfying. Note that the dark chocolate drizzle on top adds a bit of time to the recipe, but as with most things chocolate, it’s totally worth it. Swap in maple syrup for the honey if you follow a strict vegan diet.
Can snacking be a part of a healthy diet? Of course! When you choose a snack, choose one with protein, fat and/or fiber. All of these nutrients take longer to digest, so they fill you up. Snacks are also a great way to add extra nutrition to your day. Think of snacks like carrots and hummus, an apple with almond butter or whole-grain crackers with cheese.
I make this pudding when I want something indulgent tasting, but don’t feel like eating a ton of sugar. I love mixing carob powder and cocoa powder for a more complex chocolate flavour. The carob powder also adds a natural sweetness as an added bonus. If you don’t have carob, I suggest using a bit more cocoa powder and sweetener since it will be less sweet without the carob. Serve cold or heated up! 
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