Can snacking be a part of a healthy diet? Of course! When you choose a snack, choose one with protein, fat and/or fiber. All of these nutrients take longer to digest, so they fill you up. Snacks are also a great way to add extra nutrition to your day. Think of snacks like carrots and hummus, an apple with almond butter or whole-grain crackers with cheese.
There are simple tricks to help out any lazy cook with making meals. The most important trick is to keep lots of spices and sauces in your kitchen. Spices like turmeric, black pepper and sea salt, cinnamon and cayenne pepper are sure to pair well with most plant-based ingredients. These Chipotle Vegetable Stuffed Avocados are flavored with …yup, you guessed it: chipotle. Sauces like teriyaki, soy, mustard and balsamic are great starters in marinades for plant-protein sources like tofu, beans or tempeh. Another trick for the lazy cook is to use basic, yet satisfying ingredients. This means straying away from processed foods and choosing fresh or frozen vegetables and grains instead. Here are some of the best meal ideas that would suit any lazy chef. These ideas are economical, hearty, vegan-friendly, and best of all, don’t require your whole night in the kitchen.
Though avocado toast has become something of a cliché, it's popular for a reason—a slice of hearty toast spread with creamy avocado, drizzled with a bit of olive oil, and sprinkled with salt makes a simple, filling, and tasty snack (or breakfast!). If you need a little more excitement than what the basic formula offers, we've got plenty of different ways to give it a twist. One of our favorites is this bright vegan version, which gets its springtime vibe from sweet baby peas, slivers of crisp radish, and fresh basil.
If you’re not a big on raw veggies, this is a great way to sneak more of them into your diet. In addition to the vitamin-packed veggies, hummus is high in protein, fibre and healthy fats to keep you satisfied for hours. Slice up a bunch of carrots, celery, mushrooms and your other favourite veggies and dig in. I recommend preparing a batch on the weekend as well as pre-chopping a selection of veggies for quick, healthy weekday snacks.
I would like to leave my mark on this floating rock that we call Earth by showing the world and humanity that being a vegan is not difficult, and that it’s just a simple change in mindset and lifestyle. It is in my greatest hopes that you find my content educational, inspirational, funny & witty, but most importantly a community where we come together where we live in peace and harmony.
Need to use up some leftover ingredients? Make a pita pizza! Don’t fret about making the dough, that’s what whole grain pita bread is for. While pita bread makes filling and tasty sandwiches, it’s also a great base for loading toppings on. Whole grain pita bread is typically high in protein and fiber, and it’s ideal for the lazy vegan because it’s already cooked for you! Pita pizza is also awesome because it’s just the right size for one person. Start with pita bread, spread on some sauce, add some non-dairy cheese, and pile on any vegetables you have on hand. This Vegan Pepper Jack Cashew Cheese is my favorite as it will add some spice to your Homemade Pita Bread. For an easy fix, use store-bought vegan cheese like Daiya or Tofutti. Mushrooms, tomatoes, spinach or broccoli are healthy options for vegetable toppings, and many of these can come frozen or from a jar. Check out this Ultimate Guide to Making Homemade Pizza and simply use a pita for the base. After assembled, pop your pita in an oven at 425 degrees for 8-10 minutes and you’ve got yourself a quick and wholesome meal.
For the second part, I made 3 different recipes. All of them are SUPER easy, a baby could make them. Well, not really but maybe five year olds could. These are so easy that they don’t even really constitute a written “recipe” but I’ll try to give you one anyway. It’s one of those weird things that when the recipe is too easy, it’s almost difficult to write a recipe… I don’t know if that makes sense lol.

Making homemade potato chips is surprisingly easy—just slice the potatoes thin, boil them in vinegar-spiked water, and fry until crispy. The vinegar keeps the chips from getting too dark as they fry. All of our custom potato chip seasonings are vegan, and this one, despite the name, is no exception. Savory nutritional yeast helps mimic the taste of the roasted bird; we grind it up along with granulated garlic, lemon zest, dried thyme, and dried mushrooms to round out the flavors, then toss the spice blend with freshly fried chips to coat.
That same vegan nacho cheese sauce makes for a serious plate of nachos. We use freshly fried tortilla wedges (they're sturdier than store-bought chips) as the base for vegan refried beans and chili, Roasted-Tomato Salsa, guacamole, and tons of fresh and pickled veggies. Layering the chips and toppings for even coverage is a little extra work, but it's worth it for the many more balanced bites you'll get.
Instead of meaty mushrooms, this vegetarian pâté relies on nutty pecans and the deep umami flavor of roasted cauliflower. The recipe calls for butter and cream to get a smooth consistency, but you can easily replace those ingredients with oil and vegetable stock in the same quantities. The result is a dip that's slightly less pâté-like, but just as tasty.
Popcorn is high in fiber and even delivers a little protein. A 1-ounce serving (about 3 cups) of air-popped popcorn has 4 grams of fiber, almost 4 grams of protein and clocks in at 110 calories. This combination makes it a snack with staying power. Popcorn is actually a whole grain and 3 cups is a huge serving-especially when you compare it to other crunchy, salty snacks like chips. Many companies are making bagged popcorn, see our favorite healthy popcorn picks.

A mini-meal snack is a good idea when dinner is a long way off. The combo of tomato soup and baby carrots is not just filling; it also gives you lots of body-healthy nutrients, like potassium, cancer-fighting lycopene, and beta-carotene. Try a microwavable soup cup that you can stash in your car's cup holder. (Concerned about sodium? Pour about a quarter of the soup down the drain and dilute the rest with water, says McLachlan.)


For a dairy-free take on addictive spinach-artichoke dip, a purée of cooked cauliflower and raw cashews proves impressively effective as a creamy base. We blitz them in the food processor along with the cauliflower cooking liquid, then add flavor to the mixture with vegan mayonnaise (homemade or store-bought), nutritional yeast, mustard, garlic powder, and lemon juice. Add the artichokes and cooked spinach, pulse until combined, and it's ready to be baked until browned and bubbling.
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